The Journey

I traveled, recently, with several people that are as old as me and many who were older and some much younger.

 

 

One gentleman spoke of his career in the financial services industry and how he had to travel across the country for his job and the stresses that ensued from his position’s high demands.

He went on to mention that upon his retirement he thought he would take some additional course work in his career field but that his wife had admonished him that he should take university courses that would lead to a college degree.  So, this is what he was doing and even on the Caribbean Cruise, utilizing the ship’s, what he called ‘spotty’ internet, to facilitate his studies.

He had cycled in France and enjoyed the experience very much.

He had a Jaguar that he enjoyed driving.

 

 

Lizbe, was from South Africa and her husband was from Romania.  They worked with Park West Gallery and travelled around the world, on Cruise Ships, Auctioning Fine Art.

One dinner, on the cruise, we sat by two women from South Carolina…and one was an enthusiastic sports fan.  When asked about her team she became loud enough for all to hear as she expounded on their merits and the opposing teams…demerits.

Another woman that was sitting nearby said that she and her husband had cruised 29 times…and I, meekly, mentioned that we had cruised a handful of times in comparison to them.

We had dinner, the last night of the cruise, with a group of people where when everyone was seated the lights were turned down low and a multi-media video presentation began on the plate in front of you.  The Petit Chef began by boating up to your plate from the river, that had been the table, and exiting the boat to harpoon first one lobster and then another…and then to subsequently drag the, captured creatures, to your plate.  When the lights were raised…your lobster entree was in front of you.

We laughed heartily at the antics of the Petit Chef and his herculean work in preparing each of our courses.

At the shop in Bonaire where we purchased a hat for Mary Jane.  The kind lady that sold it to us was inquisitive as to what it was like to cruise and did the ship bob up and down a lot.

Being on a cruise is a bit like being a member of the human family on our beloved planet, earth.  We are so diverse and yet so much alike.

 

 

A smile almost always begets a smile.

Kindness and concern for another human being…causes kindness and concern to return to you.

Listening and listening and listening…and absorbing what you are hearing is a panacea to the person who is speaking to you.  Often when you hear how much a person is liked and respected by others…it is because that person is a good listener.

I have made it a practice, for many years, to mention a strength of each person that I encounter…to them.  I always mention something that I truly mean and that has impressed me about the person that I am speaking with.

We are spiritual beings in earthly bodies.

 

 

‘We are all just walking each other home.’   Ram Dass

 

2 responses

  1. A lovely depiction of the faces of everyday people, cruise ships and religion. I especially loved the one of a photographer being photographed whilst photographing! You are right in that we are all sojourners of life and in this journey of life you made a difference by listening to people. This is very nice as not everyone gives a time of day to stop and just chat or listen. You are kind. Loved the religious photos too. Thanks for an enlightening read. They say a picture paints a thousand words and yours did just that. Happy weekene BJ

    1. Thank you, my friend. 🌞

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